Parasitic Growth

Concept animation for the parasitic development of enclave structures leeching “power” through the existing

for blog

Urban Field Development

Urban archipelago simulation showing informal growth developing in areas between formally planned communities. These growth areas are chosen based on a resource attraction provided by existing infrastructure (the red line), and based on areas of least expansion potential in the urban field.
As the planned settlements begin to grow this expansion potential increases and the informal settlements are pushed back to allow for further development.

Spatial Field Investigations

Initial simulations exploring the relational field interactions between settlements and how these develop over time. The field strength of the individual settlements are based on ‘available resources’ to the wider area. Settlements expand at varied rates and increase their field of influence, thus reducing the overall available resources to the urban system and ultimately absorbing the smaller urban nodes.

Form Development

At the request of Brewery Wharf, Abstract Machines is in the process of designing a Christmas installation in place of the traditional Christmas tree. Here are initial developments of form from the tessellation system, applying the use of grid structure for strength and patterning, aiming to imply the form of a tree.

Tree

Christmas

Lighting Studies

Of Particular interest to the installation development is the use of light, the interaction between shadow pattern light and form. Here are examples of physical and digital light studies performed on the developing structural systems.
Shdow Tests

light lattern

scale 5 view 2 44 passes

1-2 view 1 23 passes

5 scale view 4

scale 1-2 view 4 29 passes

3333

Panel Experimentation

Panel model 1Further to the previous experiment came investigation into paneling and patterned systems.

Iterative Tesselation

Initial Concept [Idea 1]

Iteractive Tesselation

As part of initial geometric investigations for the upcoming Abstract Machines winter installation I began exploring tessellation using an iterative process, producing digital and physical outcomes.

Urbanism experiment

Density

Density attractor

Elevation

Height constraints for views to attractor (e.g. coastline)

Variation

Geometry defined by warped grid to incorporate infrastructure

Zaha eatyourheart out

Primary transport routes added to differentiate between major and minor roads

A quick experiment I did this morning drawing obvious inspiration from ZHA’s Urban design schemes. The aim was to investigate how the theory of ‘urban fields’ can be put into practice for town and city planning and to explore the benefits and pitfalls of utilising this methodology.
The premise of this approach is that the city is a dynamic, fluid system as opposed to a collection of static objects.

In order to achieve this, urban systems must be distilled down to their relational principles, and their effects on each other quantified in order to be input as generative rules.

The entire geometry in this experiment was created using a single mesh plane. The plane was subdivided into a grid, this grid was then manipulated based on a density attractor to indicate the ‘population centre.’ The building heights were defined based on the relationship between density and an imaginary geographical feature. Smaller plots on the grid were made taller to maximise land use, weighted against the requirement for a view towards the attractor.
This field interaction is a good simulation of how a commercial field (the requirement to maximise land use) might interact with an architectural/civil field (providing views to as many plots as possible.)
Finally two primary roads were added to further constrain the development.

A pretty quick experiment with lots of issues, but food for thought regarding my thesis project which will incorporate a master planning exercise for an abandoned city.

AA Emergent Architecture Exhibition

The Bartlett and Westminster summer shows have finished but the AA student show is open for 2 more weeks (until the 19th of July). Michael Weinstock’s unit (no less) investigates architectural emergence… and the models look incredible. I’ve got a couple of spare sofas at my place (Fulham) if any of you fancy the trip south. The unit’s website features a good taste of the work if you can’t make it, or need some inspiration for next year:

http://pr2014.aaschool.ac.uk/EMERGENT-TECHNOLOGIES

Poiesis- Exhibition [06.06.14]

Exhibition Sheets Paul Bedson

Exhibition Sheets Paul Bedson2

The pursuit of elegance is one of the aspirations of this project. The proposal is to design a beautiful, programmatically responsible low cost temporary structure. The structure is to act as a manifold articulating the generative processes of physical, environmental and cultural information in its being. The intervention is to be an orientating device for urban explorers who regularly visit the church, highlighting the significant features around the structure. The aim being to increase photography of these features before they are lost to decay and collapse.

The approach was to investigate in depth, the philosophical notion of the ‘abstract machine’ as a vehicle for delivering a highly sensitive intervention into a rich cultural, historical and troubled context.

Of particular interest to this project was the study of tectonics and limited beings; the idea that structures are complex energy and material systems that have a life span. They exist as part of an environment of other active systems, and develop in evolutionary waves. Along this same research path, biological fabrication methods were also explored. Research was carried out into how silk worms could be manipulated to infill a specifically designed scaffold system, derived from taking the church’s significant features as anchor points. These armatures were then cast towards a centroid, and a form was created based on the elastic deformation of the imbalanced forces, coupled with accelerated decay from sunlight.

Poiesis – Nick Hart-Woods

Nick HW -1

system overview

POIESIS
The project, located above a druidic stone circle, focused on the design of
an installation that would utilise digitally coordinated aerial drones to create
controlled light patterns that directed visitors gaze to specific astrological events.
Aiming to return a celestial connection to the stone circle that had been lost over
time, through light patterns viewed in varied ways by the naked eye or through
the use of photographic interaction.

Poiesis – Nick Hart-Woods

POIESIS
The project, located above a druidic stone circle, focused on the design of
an installation that would utilise digitally coordinated aerial drones to create
controlled light patterns that directed visitors gaze to specific astrological events.
Aiming to return a celestial connection to the stone circle that had been lost over
time, through light patterns viewed in varied ways by the naked eye or through
the use of photographic interaction.